What's On This Week?

Hilary 2018

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Week 6, Hilary 2018

Monday 19

12 noon

The Public Role of History Seminar

Marianne Wilson (National Archives)

‘Archives and Researchers’

 

Roy Griffiths Room, Keble College

 

5.00pm

Italian Renaissance Seminar

Maya Corry (Oxford University)

‘Neoplatonism, Aristotelianism, body and soul in Leonardo’s Milan’

 

St Catherine’s College

 

5.00–6.45pm

All Souls Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

John Christie (Oxford)

‘Enlightenment's Apocalypse: prophecy, providence and science in the work of Joseph Priestley’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls

Tuesday 20

5.15pm

Early Modern Graduate Forum

Georgina Wilson, "‘Take care in the cutting out’: John Blagrave's Mathematical Iewel and the Material Transmission of Knowledge."

Sophie Zhuang, "'The Hateful Siege of Contraries': Satan’s Paradoxical Speech and Milton’s Theodicy."

 

Seminar Room B, St Cross Building

Wednesday 21

2.00-3.30pm

The Relation of Literature and Learning to Social Hierarchy in Early Modern Europe

Raphaël Garrod (University of Cambridge):

‘It Takes One to Know One: Erasmian Ingenuity and the (Un)making of Scholarly Communities’

 

Isabelle Moreau (École Normale Supérieure, Lyon):

‘Amazons, Idlers, and the Republic of Letters’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls College

 

2.00-

4.00pm

Early Modern German Culture Seminar

Kerstin Weiand (Marburg)

‘Hessen-Kassel and the Peace of Westphalia (title tbc)’

Gerry Martin Room, History Faculty

 

5.00pm

Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

Karine Chemla (Université Paris Diderot)

‘Forms of proofs for algebraic equations in medieval China’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls College

Thursday 22

5.00pm

(tea from 4.45)

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Prof. Alexandra Walsham (University of Cambridge)

Discussion of the James Ford Lectures in British History

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5.00-7.00pm

Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

Mark Everist (University of Southampton)

‘Music, Pleasure and the Intertextual Arts in the Long Thirteenth Century’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls

Friday 23

5.00pm

Ford Lectures: The Reformation of the Generations

Professor Alexandra Walsham (University of Cambridge)

‘Memory and Archive’

South School, Examinations Schools

 

Week 5, Hilary 2018

Monday 12

5.00pm

Italian Renaissance Seminar

Oscar Schiavone (Durham University)

‘Luca Martini: Dante scholar and patron of the arts in the service of the Medici’

 

St Catherine’s College

 

5.00–6.45pm

All Souls Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

DAVID LINES (Warwick)

‘Philosophical teaching in sixteenth-century Bologna’.

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls

Tuesday 13

5.15pm

Early Modern English Literature Seminar

Elizabeth Clarke (Warwick), David Norbrook (Merton) and Jane Stevenson (Campion Hall)

Panel discussion to mark the publication of Lucy Hutchinson, Theological Writings and Translations, Oxford University Press

 

Fitzjames Room, Merton College

 

5.30-7.00pm

TORCH Network on Diplomacy in the Early Modern Period (1400-1800)

Sir Noel Malcolm (All Souls College, Oxford)

‘The same game, but with different rules: Western diplomats in early modern Istanbul’

 

Seminar Room, 3d Floor, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Wednesday 14

5.00pm

Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

Natasha Glaisyer (University of York)

‘Speaking, reading, writing and printing numbers in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century England’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls College

Thursday 15 3.30-5.00pm

Words and Things in Early Modern French Culture

Jessica Goodman (St Catherine’s College)

“Gloire”

 

Maison Française d’Oxford

 

5.00pm

(tea from 4.45)

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Wesley Correa (Corpus Christi College)

‘Political Dialogue, Exchange and Propaganda, c. 1461-1537’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5.15pm

(tea from 5.00)

Early Modern French Seminar

Andrea Frisch (University of Maryland)

“Decorum and the Dignity of Memory”

 

Maison Française d’Oxford

Friday 16

2.00-4.00pm

Early Modern German Culture Seminar

Craig Harline (Brigham Young)

‘A World Ablaze: The Rise of Martin Luther and the Birth of the Reformation’, followed by a presentation of Reformation pamphlets held by the Taylor Library

Taylor Institution Library

 

5.00pm

Ford Lectures: The Reformation of the Generations

Professor Alexandra Walsham (University of Cambridge)

‘History and Time’

 

South School, Examinations Schools

 

 

Week 4, Hilary 2018

Monday 5

12 noon

The Public Role of History Seminar

Oliver Cox (Oxford)

‘Developing research-led collaborations in the heritage sector: a how to guide’

 

Roy Griffiths Room, Keble College

 

2.00-3.30pm

The Relation of Literature and Learning to Social Hierarchy in Early Modern Europe

JENNY OLIVER (St John’s College, Oxford):

‘The Building of Knowledge and the Building of Society: Montaigne’s bastiment’

 

CATHERINE RICHARDSON (University of Kent):

‘Assessing the Learning of the Early Modern English Middling Sort: Material and Textual Sources’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls College

 

5.00pm

Italian Renaissance Seminar

Ambrogio Camozzi Pistoja (Cambridge University)

‘Insulting women and women insulting in early modern Italy: Literary and criminal history’

 

St Catherine’s College

 

5.00–6.45pm

All Souls Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

Daniel Garber (Princeton),

‘Novatores: negotiating novelty in early modern philosophy’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls

Tuesday 6

5.15pm

Early Modern Graduate Forum

Kilian Schindler, "Pigs and Puritans: Conversion in Ben Jonson's Bartholomew Fair."

Katie Ebner-Landy, "Problems with Political Readings of Early Modern Drama: The Case of The Troublesome Raigne."

 

Seminar Room B, St Cross Building

Wednesday 7

2.00-4.00pm

Early Modern German Culture Seminar

Christiane Andersson (Bucknell)

‘Censorship of Art in the Reformation in Germany’

 

Colin Matthews Room, History Faculty

 

5.00pm

Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

Emmylou Haffner (Bergische Universität Wuppertal)

‘Insights into the long “genesis” of Dedekind’s lattice theory’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls College

Thursday 8

5.00pm

(tea from 4.45)

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Ernesto Oyarbide Magana (Wolfson College)

‘Procuring “Local Knowledge”. The Library of the First Count of Gondomar in the context of his Diplomacy’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5.00-7.00pm

Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

James Burke (University of Cambridge)

The making and re-making of the Sadler partbooks: GB-Ob MSS Mus. e. 1–5

 

Wharton Room, All Souls

 

5:15-6:45pm

 

Early Modern, Early Career Reading Group

Pre-circulated readings: James Mulholland, "What I've Learned about Revising a Dissertation" (2011) and "What I've Learned about Publishing a Book" (2014). Please email dianne.mitchell@queens.ox.ac.uk for questions or for the readings. All welcome!

 

"The Library," meeting room above Turl Street Kitchen

Friday 9

5.00pm

Ford Lectures: The Reformation of the Generations

Professor Alexandra Walsham (University of Cambridge)

‘Generation and Generations’

 

South School, Examinations Schools

 

Week 3, Hilary 2018

Monday 29

5.00pm

Italian Renaissance Seminar

Christa Gardner von Teuffel (Oxford)

‘Brunelleschi Impresario: new chapels and new altarpieces at San Lorenzo, Florence’ 

 

St Catherine’s College

 

5.00–6.45pm

All Souls Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

Timothy Twining (Caius College, Cambridge)

‘Richard Simon and the remaking of biblical criticism, c. 1665–1685’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls

Tuesday 30

5.15pm

Early Modern English Literature Seminar

Peter Womack (University of East Anglia)

‘Tyrannical humours: bad kings on the Elizabethan stage’.

 

Mure Room, Merton College

Wednesday 31

5.00pm

Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

Katharina Habermann (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen)

‘Gauss’s diary, Riemann’s Hypothesis, and Klein’s letters: the central archive for mathematics bequests in Göttingen’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls College

Thursday 1

5.00pm

(tea from 4.45)

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Prof. Peter Marshall (Warwick Univ.)

‘Long Reformation in the Far North: Kirk and Culture in Early Modern Orkney’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

Friday 2

5.00pm

Ford Lectures: The Reformation of the Generations

Professor Alexandra Walsham (University of Cambridge)

‘Ancestry and Genealogy’

 

South School, Examinations Schools

 

Week 2, Hilary 2018

Monday 22

5.00pm

Italian Renaissance Seminar

Cordelia Warr (Manchester University)

'Touch, texture and the Franciscan habit’

 

St Catherine’s College

 

5.00–6.45pm

All Souls Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

Richard Serjeantson (Trinity College, Cambridge)

‘Francis Bacon in Poland: for and against the “Great Instauration” in Second Reformation Europe’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls

Tuesday 23

5.15pm

Early Modern Graduate Forum

Christopher Gausden, "Walter Quin: A Scottish Court Poet and the English Court in the 1590s.”

Lucia Alden, "Playing with Profit in Early Modern Theatre."

 

Seminar Room B, St Cross Building

Wednesday 24

2.00-3.30pm

The Relation of Literature and Learning to Social Hierarchy in Early Modern Europe

Tiffany Stern (The Shakespeare Institute, University of Birmingham):

‘Puppets, Bibelots, and Ballad-sheets: Literature as Artefact in Early Modern Europe’

 

Phil Withington (University of Sheffield):

‘Reading, Writing, and Social Practice in Early Modern England’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls College

 

5.00pm

Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

Ralf Krömer (Bergische Universität Wuppertal)

‘Justification of axioms: a neglected topic in the history of mathematics?’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls College

Thursday 25

5.00pm

(tea from 4.45)

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Prof. Jason Peacey (UCL)

‘“To Move the First Day of Term”: Strategies, Practices and a Seventeenth-Century Microhistory’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5.00-7.00pm

Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

Yolanda Plumley (University of Exeter)

Music and the Staging of Princely Power in Late Medieval France

 

Wharton Room, All Souls

Friday 26

5.00pm

Ford Lectures: The Reformation of the Generations

Professor Alexandra Walsham (University of Cambridge)

‘Kith and Kin’

South School, Examinations Schools

 

 

Week 1, Hilary 2018

Monday 15

5.00pm

Italian Renaissance Seminar

Luca Giuliani (Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin)

‘Michelangelo’s David and his Sling’

 

St Catherine’s College

 

5.00–6.45pm

All Souls Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

Renée Raphael (University of California, Irvine)

‘Mechanics in the margins: an anonymous annotator, eclectic reading, and Galileo's Two New Sciences’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls

Tuesday 16

5.15pm

Early Modern English Literature Seminar

Lucy Munro (King’s College, London)

‘New Histories of the Blackfriars Playhouse’

 

Mure Room, Merton College

Wednesday 17

5.00pm

Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

Christopher Hollings (University of Oxford)

‘“Black strokes upon white paper”: changing attitudes towards symbolic algebra from the nineteenth into the twentieth century’

 

Hovenden Room, All Souls College

Thursday 18

5.00pm

(tea from 4.45)

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Dr Ceri Law (Univ. of Cambridge)

‘Remembering and Forgetting Recantation in the English Reformation’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

Friday 19

5.00pm

Ford Lectures: The Reformation of the Generations

Professor Alexandra Walsham (University of Cambridge)

‘Youth and Age’

 

South School, Examinations Schools

 

Michaelmas 2017

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It's the final week of term! A timetable for the week can be found below, and full listings for the term are available on our events page. If you are organizing an event and would like to see it featured here, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

Monday 27th

5.15pm

Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

Professor David Brewer (Ohio State University)

‘What is an Authorial Portrait?’

 

Old Library, Hertford College

 

5.30pm

Seminars in the History of Collecting

Frederica Gigante (Warburg Institute and SOAS)

The collection of Islamic artworks of Ferdinando Cospi (1606-1686)

 

The Wallace Collection Lecture Theatre, London W1U 3BN

Tuesday 28th  

5.15pm

Early Modern Graduate Form

Aleida Auld, “Donne’s Satires and the Rise of Metaphysical Poetry.”

Arianna Hijazin, “‘What needs this iterance?': repetition and the figure of Echo in Shakespeare.”

 

History of the Book Room, English Faculty

 

5.30pm-7.30pm

TORCH Network on Early Modern Diplomacy (1400-1800) – RSVP Required

Dr Tobias Graf (University of Oxford, Faculty of History

'Knowledge for Decision Makers: Austrian-Habsburg Foreign Intelligence in the Late Sixteenth Century')

 

Seminar Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Wednesday 29th 

5pm

Graduate Seminar in History, 1680-1850

George Artley (Lincoln)

‘No Longer The King’s Bench? Sir John Holt, the Common Law, and the Impact of the Glorious Revolution’

 

Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College

 

5.15pm

Early Modern World Seminar

Mary Lindemann

‘Rebuilding Landscapes, Reconstructing Lives: Brandenburg after the Thirty Years War’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls

 

5pm

Merton History of the Book Group – RSVP Required

Professor David Hook (Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages, Oxford)

"Juan de Mariana's History of Spain, from Madrid to Merton and beyond"

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

Thursday 30th 

5pm

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Dr Steven Reid (Univ. of Glasgow)

‘The False Scots Urchin and his Dearest Sister: James, Elizabeth and Factional Politics in Scotland, 1583-1584’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5pm-7pm

Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

Andreas Janke (University of Hamburg)

‘Revisiting the tradition of late-medieval Florentine song: shedding multispectral light on Trecento music’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls

There's lots on in Week 7, including the first meeting of the ECR reading group and the Faculty of History Annual Special Lecture on 'Books, Print and the Reformation' given by Professor Thomas Kauffmann.

A timetable for the week can be found below, and full listings for the term are available on our events page. If you are organizing an event and would like to see it featured here, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

 

Monday 20th

12 noon

Reading Group: Studying the Past in 2017

Uses and Abuses of History: The Middle Ages in particular have been the topic of interest of White Supremacists. This session introduces some of the main targets of White Supremacists, and opens wider conversations on how scholars can deal with such misappropriation.

 

Stafford Crane Room, Keble College

Tuesday 21st 

5.15pm

Early Modern English Literature Seminar

Hester Lees-Jeffries (St Catharine’s, Cambridge)

‘Inky Cloaks: Black cloth and black pages, performance and paratext’

 

Mure Room, Merton College

 

 

5.30pm-7.00pm

TORCH Network on Early Modern Diplomacy (1400-1800) - RSVP Required

Dr Helen Jacobsen (The Wallace Collection)

‘Decorative Supremacy. French diplomatic gifts in the 18th century’

 

Colin Matthew Room, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Wednesday 22nd  

11.15am

– 1pm

Early Modern World Seminar

Ana Valdez

‘António Vieira and the "Clavis Prophetatum": A Portuguese Fifth Imperialistic Project’

 

Rees Davies Room, History Faculty

 

5pm

Graduate Seminar in History, 1680-1850

Hamish Scott (Jesus)

‘The British “Fiscal-Military” State after Thirty Years’

 

Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College

  5:15pm

Early Career Researcher Reading Group

Katherine Hunt and Dianne Mitchell (Queen's)

We'll be discussing Catherine Gallagher's "The Rise of Fictionality" (please email us if you'd like a pdf). The essay explores mid-eighteenth-century texts, but with many gestures forward and back which should prompt robust discussion. Come for a drink or a cup of tea, a chance to meet colleagues, and a great conversation.

 

Wadham Room at the King's Arms

Thursday 23rd 

5pm

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Dr Charmian Mansell (Univ. of Exeter and TORCH)

‘Space, Place, and Experiences of Service: evidence from the church court depositions of early modern England’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5pm

Faculty of History Annual Special Lecture

Books, Print and the Reformation

Professor Thomas Kaufmann (University of Göttingen)

 

East Schools, Examination Schools

 

 

 

As Week 6 approaches, be sure not to miss any of the great events taking place in Oxford. A timetable for the week can be found below, and full listings for the term are available on our events page. If you are organizing an event and would like to see it featured here, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

 

Monday 13th

5.15pm

Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

Graduate Presentations

Dan Sperrin, ‘Bad Reception: Marcus Aurelius and His Meditations’

Helen Brown, ‘"Like a true Coxcomb": Pope as poseur in his self-published’ letters

 

Old Library, Hertford College

Tuesday 14th  

5.15pm

Early Modern Graduate Form

Fraser Buchanan, “'Contrived’ authorship? John Prideaux and the Early Modern Literary Executor.”

Rachael Hodge, “Frances Wolfreston Her Almanacs: A Seventeenth-Century Reader Re-read."

 

History of the Book Room, English Faculty

Wednesday 15th 

11.15am

– 1pm

Early Modern World Seminar

Adrianna Catena

‘New Materials, Old Conflicts: The Craft of Dyeing in 16th- Century Spain’

 

Rees Davies Room, History Faculty

 

5pm

Graduate Seminar in History, 1680-1850

Lydia Hamlett (Cambridge):

‘Myth-making and Mural Painting in Britain, 1680-1730’

 

Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College

Thursday 16th 

5pm

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Prof. Nandini Das (Univ. of Liverpool)

‘Sir Thomas Roe: Memory, Transculturality, and the Incorporated Self’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5pm-7pm

Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

Joseph Mason (University of Oxford)

‘‘Sweetly divided': Analytical propositions and problems for the thirteenth-century jeu-parti’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls

 

Welcome to week 5! Highlights this week include seminar papers from Professor Stephen Guy-Bray (UBC), on 'the queerness of representation in the Renaissance’, and Professor Deb Oxley on 'The Digital Panopticon’.

A timetable for the week can be found below, and full listings for the term are available on our events page. If you are organizing an event and would like to see it featured here, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

Monday 6th

12 noon

Reading Group: Studying the Past in 2017

The Present in Teaching: At a time when students more readily make connections between past and present, we should ask whether and how we can discuss these in the classroom. How can we encourage students to use their historical thinking more broadly? And how, in acknowledging diversity, do we not fall in the trap of forcing identities and roles upon our students and colleagues?

 

Stafford Crane Room, Keble College

Tuesday 7th

5.15pm

Early Modern English Literature Seminar

Stephen Guy-Bray (University of British Columbia)

‘Becoming Art: the queerness of representation in the Renaissance’

 

Mure Room, Merton College

 

Wednesday 8th

11.15am

– 1pm

Early Modern World Seminar

1. ‘Religion in the Armies of the Thirty Years War’

2. ‘Early Modern Amsterdam: The European Market for War-Making’

Ryan Crimmins, Marianne Klerk

 

Rees Davies Room, History Faculty

 

5pm

Graduate Seminar in History, 1680-1850

Deb Oxley (All Souls)

‘The Digital Panopticon: The Global Impact of London Punishments’

 

Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College

Thursday 9th

5pm

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Prof. Andy Wood (Durham Univ.)

‘Work and Social Relations in England, 1500-1640’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

Friday 10th

2-6pm

Material history of sciences & techniques, Workshop "Reenactment issues, knowledge and practices" 

Pascal Brioist (Centre d’Etudes Supérieures de la Renaissance (CESR), Université de Tours)

"Building a serious game about Leonardian mechanics : issues and challenges'

 

Maison Française d’Oxford

Midway through term and Oxford has yet another vibrant selection of early modern events, including a paper on Tudor Empire as part of The Long History of Identity, Ethnicity and Nationhood Research Network.

A timetable for the week can be found below, and full listings for the term are available on our events page. If you are organizing an event and would like to see it featured here, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

Monday 30th

5.15pm

Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

Naomi Tiley and James Howarth (Balliol College Library)

‘Any given book: Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-century libraries at Balliol’

 

St Cross Church, Manor Road

Tuesday 31st 

4pm

Graduate Seminar in History, 1680-1850

George Van Cleve (Seattle)

‘The Birth of the American Empire: The Articles of Confederation and the Road to the Constitution’

 

Rothermere American Institute

 

5pm

‘The Long History of Ethnicity & Nationhood Reconsidered’ Seminar

Jessica S. Hower (Southwestern University)

Tudor Empire: The Making of Britain and the British Atlantic World

 

Stanford House, Oxford (65 High Street).

 

 

5.15pm

Early Modern Graduate Form

Olivia Anderson: “Concord Through Discord: Conversion in Richard Baxter's Poetical Fragments.”

Audrey Borowski: “The Horizon of the Human Doctrine to The Restitution (Apokatastasis): Leibniz between finite Combinatorics and infinite Metaphysics.”

 

History of the Book Room, English Faculty

Wednesday 1st

11.15am

– 1pm

Early Modern World Seminar

Giuseppe Marcocci

‘Visual Dissent in the Iberian Empires, 1500-1700’

 

Rees Davies Room, History Faculty

Thursday 2nd 

5pm

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Dr Angela McShane (Wellcome Collection)

‘“Holy Harmony”: Puritans and Popular Song in seventeenth-century England’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5pm-7pm

Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

Adam Whittaker (Birmingham City University)

‘Models of exemplarity: towards an understanding of Tinctoris’s musical examples’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls

 Welcome to Week 3! One-off events for this week include the EHRC ‘Ovid 2000’ celebration, ‘Shakespeare in the Alley’, and the final instalment of Victoria Kahn’s Clarendon Lectures.

 

Monday 23rd

12 noon

Reading Group: Studying the Past in 2017

The Present in Research: This session centres around ‘Presentism’. Looking at the past through the prism of the present used to be a sin, a dangerous anachronism. However, scholars increasingly realise that the questions of the present shape our understanding of the past. How and to what extent can present preoccupations and analytical frameworks illuminate the past?

 

Stafford Crane Room, Keble College

 

5pm

Medieval History Seminar

Oren Margolis (Somerville), Graham Barrett (University of Lincoln)

'Pontifex Maximus: From Numa Pompilius to James I'

 

Wharton Room, All Souls College

Tuesday 24th 

5.30pm 

Clarendon Lectures 2017

Professor Victoria Kahn (UC Berkeley)

‘Literariness in Kant, Kierkegaard and Coetzee’

 

Lecture Theatre 2, English Faculty

Wednesday 25th

11.15am

– 1pm

Early Modern World Seminar

Fabian Persson

‘The Court as the World: Refocussing a Nobility on Court Life’

 

Rees Davies Room, History Faculty

 

5pm

Graduate Seminar in History, 1680-1850

Hamish Roberts (St. Antony’s)

‘Changing Understandings of Time in Late Eighteenth-century Britain: Richard Price, Doctrine, and Revolution’

 

Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College

Thursday 26th 

5pm

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Professor Ann Hughes (Keele)

‘The Scribal Legacies of Katherine Gell 1645-1730’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

Friday 27th

2pm

Ovid 2000: An Oxford Celebration

A series of talks on aspects of Ovid's poetry and its reception: http://www.ehrc.ox.ac.uk/Ovid2000

 

Weston Lecture Theatre, Broad Street

Sunday 29th

4pm-4.45pm

'Shakespeare in the Alley'

Performed by Professor Paul Lodge (guitar and voice)

A selection of songs loosely based on individual works (plays and sonnets) by William Shakespeare. Words and Music by Richard and Paul Lodge.

 

The Sir Joseph Hotung Auditorium, Mansfield College

 

 After a great start to term, we are already on to Week 2. This week's events include a talk from Stephen Grant at the Oxford Bibliographical Society, and the year's first Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music. Full listings for the term are available on our events page. If you are organizing an event and would like to see it featured here, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

 

Monday 16th

5.15pm

Oxford Bibliographical Society

Stephen Grant

‘Collecting Shakespeare: the lives and books of Henry and Emyly Folger’

 

Upper Library, Christ Church

  5.15pm

Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

Dr Kim Simpson (University of Southampton)

'Heterogeneous Animals: queer bodies in mid-eighteenth-century fiction by women'

 

Old Library, Hertford College

Tuesday 17th

5pm

Spanish Graduate Research Seminar

Jonathan Bradbury (University of Exeter)

‘“¡Dime de aquel cabrón, suave Musa!” A re-discovered verse libel from the Spongia/Expostulatio Spongiæ polemic (1617-1619)’

 

Room 2, Taylor Institution

Wednesday 18th

11.15am

– 1pm

Early Modern World Seminar

Avi Lifschitz

‘From Göttingen to Sri Lanka: The 18th-Century Debate on Elephant Copulation and the Limits of Evidential Credibility’

 

Rees Davies Room, History Faculty

 

12.45pm

Economic and Social History Graduate Seminar

Jacopo Sartori (University of Cambridge)

‘The long road to Bank of England: characters and diffusion of early central banks, 1401-1694’

 

Butler Room, Nuffield College

 

5pm

Graduate Seminar in History, 1680-1850

Lucy Dow (National Maritime Museum)

‘‘The liquid measure is here given in Scotch; but it can in a minute be reduced into English’: Scottish and English Cookery Books and the Idea of the Nation in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-century Britain.’

 

Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College

Thursday 19th

5pm

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Charles Cornish-Dale (Lincoln College)

‘Archbishop Laud and the Corporation of Wimborne Minster, 1636-1639’

 

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5pm-7pm

Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

Philippe Canguilhem (University of Toulouse)

‘"Usuall Musicke". Singing upon the book in the Renaissance’

 

Wharton Room, All Souls

Welcome back to another year packed with events covering all things early modern. A timetable for the week can be found below, and full listings for the term are available on our events page. If you are organizing an event and would like to see it featured here, please don't hesitate to get in touch.

 

Here are this week's events; we look forward to seeing you there!

Monday 9th

12 noon

Reading Group: Studying the Past in 2017

Being public: This first session opens the broad themes on which we will build the next ones, and asks the questions at the heart of this reading group: To what extent can and should we take part in public debates? What forms could this participation take?

Stafford Crane Room, Keble College

Tuesday 10th

5.15pm

Early Modern English Literature Seminar

Professor Laurie Maguire (Magdalen, Oxford)

‘“This page left intentionally blank”: ludic space in early modern texts’

Mure Room, Merton College

 

 

11.15am

– 1pm

Early Modern World Seminar

Julia Swann

‘Roi de guerre ou Roi de paix?: Louis XV, Europe and the French Monarchy, 1736-1748’

Rees Davies Room, History Faculty

Wednesday 11th

5pm

Graduate Seminar in History, 1680-1850

Introductory party with various speakers

Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College

 

6.45pm

Early Modern Graduate Forum

Social outing: Coriolanus Broadcast Live from the RSC

Odeon, Magdalen St.

Thursday 12th

5pm

Early Modern Britain Seminar

Dr Jonathan Healey (OUDCE)

‘The Curious Case of the Cross-Dressing Catholic: Revelry and Resistance in Jacobean Lancashire’

The Breakfast Room, Merton College

 

5pm

Oxford Art History Research Seminar

Dr Alison Wright (UCL)

'Revealing Rituals: Early Modern Sculpture before Unveiling'

History of Art Lecture Theatre, Littlegate House

Trinity Term 2017

Expand All

 

It's the last week of term - see it out with some exciting research events! 

 

Monday 12 June

  • New Pespectives in Mediterranean History

11:15am, New Powell Room, Somerville College

Professor Ali Yaycioğlu (Stanford), with response from Professor Marc Baer (LSE):  ‘Partners of the Empire and the Formation of a State-Society: Rethinking the Ottoman Order in the 18th and 19th centuries’

  • Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

5:15pm, Old Library, Hertford College

Professor Ros Ballaster, Mansfield College:  ‘Being there: the fiction of presence in eighteenth-century theatre and novel’

 

Tuesday 13 June

  • Early Modern Graduate Forum

5.15pm, History of the Book Room, St. Cross Building

Beatrice Montedoro: "Dramatic Extracting in a Newly Discovered Manuscript"

Christopher Gausden: "Laelius: Sir Henry Lee (1533-1611), Literature and Politics”

 

Wednesday 14 June

  • Cultures of Collecting, 1500-1750: a one-day conference organised by the Centre for Early Modern Studies

8:30am-7pm, Jaber Auditorium, Corpus Christi College

Please see here for the conference programme and registration.

  • Seminar in the History of Pre-Modern Science

5pm, All Souls College, Old Library 

Charles Burnett (Warburg Institute, London), ‘“Arabica veritas” - Europeans’ search for “truth” in Arabic scientific and philosophical literature of the Middle Ages’

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5pm., Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Undergraduate Thesis Session: two undergraduates will discuss their recently-completed theses. All second-year undergraduates planning to undertake research in the period are encouraged to attend. 

 

Thursday 15 June

  • Religion in the British Isles, 1400-1700

5pm, Gibbs Room, Keble College (in the basement of the Warden’s Lodging: access via the main entrance of the College and Porters’ Lodge, Keble Road).

Nicholas McDowell (University of Exeter): ‘The Religion of John Milton’

 

In other news:

These round-ups are going on hiatus with the end of term, but there are a number of conferences in Oxford over the next couple of weeks that you don't want to miss, as well as the Oxford Renaissance Seminar Roundtable on 'The Nations in 16th-century Rome' on Wednesday, 21 June. We also continue to welcome guest posts about your research in progress or forthcoming publications - do get in touch. 

CEMS co-director Adam Smyth writes on paper for the TLS. 

 

 

Summer is icumen in but we still have many events to tempt you indoors in this penultimate week of term!

 

Monday 5 June

  • New Pespectives in Mediterranean History

11:15am, Old Common Room, Balliol College 

Dr Cesare Santus (L’école française de Rome): ‘Forbidden contacts: Catholic and Orthodox Christians in the Ottoman Empire (17th-18th centuries)’

This seminar is co-sponsored by the Maison française d’Oxford, the Early Modern Catholicism Network, and l’École française de Rome. 

 

Tuesday 6 June

  • Early Modern Catholicism Seminar

​5pm, Wolfson College, Seminar Room 3

Harald Braun (University of Liverpool): 'Giovanni Botero, Reason of State, and Spain'

  • Early Modern Literature Seminar

5.15pm, Ertegun House

Kathryn Murphy (Oriel College, Oxford): "The Look and the Like: Lancelot Andrewes's Real Words"​

  • Bodleian Libraries Lecture: Lorna J. Clark, "A family culture of creativity: 'Memoranda of the Burney Family'"

5:30pm, Lecture Theatre, Weston Library. Reception follows in Blackwell Hall.

For more information and to register for a free ticket: http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/whatson/whats-on/upcoming-events/2017/jun/burney-and-his-children

 

Wednesday 7 June

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5pm., Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Undergraduate Thesis Session
Two current undergraduates will discuss the experience and findings of their recently-completed theses.

  • Seminar in Early Modern European History

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Kerstin Weiand (Gießen): 'Dynamics of Crusades in Early Modernity'

  • Seminar in the History of Pre-Modern Science

5pm, All Souls College, Old Library 

Raphaëlle Garrod (CRASSH, Cambridge), 'A Spider's Tale. Jesuit Ingenuity at La Flèche in the Seventeenth Century’

  • Oxford Bibliographic Society

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Meeting to begin at 4.30 p.m. Lecture to follow at 5.15 after a brief interval for tea.

McKenna Room, Christ Church
Richard Serjeantson (Trinity College, Cambridge): 'The archival afterlife of Francis Bacon (d. 1626): from Hartlib to Harley, via Lambeth'

 

Thursday 8 June

  • Religion in the British Isles, 1400-1700

5pm, Gibbs Room, Keble College (in the basement of the Warden’s Lodging: access via the main entrance of the College and Porters’ Lodge, Keble Road).

Susan Royal (University of Durham): ‘Tolerance and History Writing in Reformation England’

 

In other news: 

Registration is still open for our upcoming CEMS conference, Cultures of Collecting, 1500-1750 (14 June 2017).

Registration is also open for a conference on The Book Index at the Bodleian (22-23 June).

And finally, for some catch-up conference listening: 

 

 

Marking can wait when there are interesting seminars to attend...

 

Monday 29 May

  • New Pespectives in Mediterranean History

11:15am, Old Common Room, Balliol College 

Dr Cecilia Tarruell (History/TORCH): ‘Beyond exclusion: Migrations from the Islamic world to the Spanish Empire in the 16th and 17th centuries’

  • Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

5:15pm, Old Library, Hertford College

Rathika Muthukumaran, ‘"Modesty in Nakedness": Siam and the Politics of Modesty in the Anonymous The Unnatural Mother’

Christy Edwall,  ‘How to do things with Linnaeus’

 

Tuesday 30 May

  • Early Modern Graduate Forum

5.15pm, History of the Book Room, St. Cross Building

Niall Allsopp: 'Thinking About Ritual in Early Modern Literature'

 

Wednesday 31 May

  • Literature and History in Early Modern England

​12.15pm, Lecture Room 6, New College

Catherine Bates (University of Warwick), ‘On Not Defending Poetry: The Economics of Sidney’s Golden World’

  • Seminar in the History of Pre-Modern Science

5pm, All Souls College, Old Library 

Justin Stover (University of Edinburgh), ‘The last astronomer's lost book: Walter le Pruz between England and France in the thirteenth century’

 

Thursday 1 June

  • Religion in the British Isles, 1400-1700

5pm, Gibbs Room, Keble College (in the basement of the Warden’s Lodging: access via the main entrance of the College and Porters’ Lodge, Keble Road).

Mark Byford (Independent Scholar): ‘Debating before Great Britain¹s Solomon: the perspective of the 'plaintiffs' at the Hampton Court Conference of 1604'

 

In other news:

"Mimesis on Trial" last week was a great success - check out the conference hashtag, #MimesisonTrial, for livetweeting of discussion.

Registration is now open for our second conference, Cultures of Collecting, 1500-1750 (14 June 2017).

 

 

 

Escape from the exam marking this week  with an exciting selection of seminars and events!

 

Monday 22 May

  • New Pespectives in Mediterranean History

11:15am, Old Common Room, Balliol College 

Professor Marilyn Booth (Magdalen), response from Dr Christina De Bellaigue (Exeter): ‘Girlhood translated? Reading Fénelon’s Traité de l’éducation des filles (1687) in twentieth-century Egypt’

  • Oxford Bibliographic Society

5.15 p.m, Weston Library Lecture Theatre

Alessandra Panzanelli Fratoni (15cBooktrade, based at the British Library): 'Reconstructing dispersed collections: Burney and Consul Smith in the British Library'

 

Tuesday 23 May

  • Early Modern Catholicism Seminar

​5pm, Wolfson College, Seminar Room 3

Sophie Nicholls (University of Oxford): 'Gallicanism in the French Wars of Religion: the case of René Choppin'

  • Early Modern Literature Seminar

5.15pm, Ertegun House

Tim Harrison (University of Chicago): "Impossible Experience: Embryology, Poetry, and the Nature of Consciousness in Early Modern England"

  • New Perspectives on the Psalms: A Series of Public Lectures

6.15pm, Ursell Room, Pusey House, St Giles

Anne Hudson: 'Devotion or language lesson? The Revision of Rolle's English Psalter'

Elizabeth Solopova: 'Englished Latin or the language of love? The Revision of the Wycliffite Psalter'

 

Wednesday 24 May

  • Literature and History in Early Modern England

​12.15pm, Lecture Room 6, New College

Scott Mandelbrote (Peterhouse, Cambridge), ‘Poetry and Perversion in Mid-Seventeenth-Century Cambridge’

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

4:30pm., Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Eric Schnakenbourg (Nantes): 'Shipping and Trade in Wartime under Neutral Flags in Eighteenth-Century Europe'

  • Seminar in Early Modern European History

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Hamish Scott (Oxford): 'Succession, Inheritance and the Formation of Europe’s Aristocracies c.1300-1750'

  • Seminar in the History of Pre-Modern Science

5pm, All Souls College, Old Library 

Anna-Marie Roos (University of Lincoln; All Souls College, Oxford), ‘The travel diary of Martin Folkes (1690-1754): Newtonianism, antiquarianism, and scientific peregrination’

 

Thursday 25 May

  • Religion in the British Isles, 1400-1700

5pm, Gibbs Room, Keble College (in the basement of the Warden’s Lodging: access via the main entrance of the College and Porters’ Lodge, Keble Road).

Lucy Kaufman (Keble College, Oxford): 'Churchwardens, Sidemen and Scavengers: Political Agency, Lay Governance, and Religious Discipline in Elizabethan London'

  • Early Modern French Seminar

5.15pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Marine Ganofsky (St Andrew’s): "La Volupté à table, ou Des Petits Soupers dans la France et la littérature du XVIIIe siècle"

  • Shakespeare / Shoreditch – film screening

5.15pm, New Library, St Anne’s College

Shoreditch, 1580: rough, edgy, unsparing, and fun. Shoreditch, 1600: expensive, emptying, with its reputation for entertainment on the wane. Sound familiar? 'Shoreditch: Shakespeare's Hidden London' is a feature-length documentary uncovering Shakespeare's early career in Shoreditch and exploring how the area has been shaped by gentrification then and now. Featuring interviews with Peter Tatchell, archaeologists, actors, and academics.

Introduced by Robert Stagg (Lecturer in English at St Anne's College, Oxford), followed by discussion with Emma Smith (Professor of Shakespeare Studies, Oxford).

Free; followed by drinks reception (c/o Oxford CEMS and St Anne's College). See Robert's blog post below for more information on the film!

 

In other news: 

Registration is open for our upcoming second CEMS conference Cultures of Collecting, 1500-1750 (14 June 2017). BYO mummified trout.

The EAJS Conference: "Jewish Books and their Christian Collectors in Europe, the New World and Czarist Russia" takes place at Christ Church this week, 22-23 May. Please see the Conferences section for other upcoming events.

CEMS members review things: Kathryn Murphy on the Voynich Manuscript; Natasha Simonova on "Black Sails". 

 

 

Many more events taking place this week, plus news on CEMS' two upcoming conferences and more below.

 

Monday 15 May

  • New Pespectives in Mediterranean History

11:15am, Old Common Room, Balliol College 

Dr Hannah Skoda (St John’s): ‘ “His master’s chattel in matters superadded to nature, though in nature things all are equal” (Aquinas). Towards a legal anthropology of late medieval slavery’

  • Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

5:15pm, Old Library, Hertford College

Professor Chloe Wigston-Smith, University of York:  ‘Bodkin Aesthetics: Ordinary Luxury and Material Metamorphosis in the Eighteenth Century'

  • Architectural History Seminar 

5:30pm, Lower Lecture Room, Lincoln College

Professor Maurice Howard (Sussex): 'The scholar in the study: creating and decorating private spaces in Renaissance England'

 

Tuesday 16 May

  • The Lyell Lectures: Paul Nelles (Carleton): 'The Vatican Library and the Counter-Reformation'

5pm, Lecture Theatre, Weston Library

4: 'Scribes in the city'. Book tickets here (free but space is limited).

  • Early Modern Graduate Forum

5.15pm, History of the Book Room, St. Cross Building

Laura Wright: "Joan la Pucelle and the Noise of War in 1 Henry VI"

Audrey Borowski: "From The Horizon of the Human Doctrine to The Restitution (Apokatastasis): Leibniz between Finite Combinatorics and Infinite Metaphysics"

 

Wednesday 17 May

  • Literature and History in Early Modern England

​12.15pm, Lecture Room 6, New College

Joseph Wallace (University of Birmingham), ‘Equality in Early Modern England: Two Diverging Accounts?’

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5pm., Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Steve Pincus (Yale): 'Patriot Fever: Imperial Political Economy and the Causes of the War of Jenkins Ear'

  • Seminar in the History of Pre-Modern Science

5pm, All Souls College, Old Library 

Matthieu Husson (Paris Observatory), ‘Alfonsine astronomy: a research project’

 

Thursday 18 May

  • Religion in the British Isles, 1400-1700

5pm, Gibbs Room, Keble College (in the basement of the Warden’s Lodging: access via the main entrance of the College and Porters’ Lodge, Keble Road).

John McCallum (Nottingham Trent University):  'Welfare and the Kirk: Poor Relief in the Reformed Church in Scotland, 1560-1650'.

  • The Lyell Lectures: Paul Nelles (Carleton):  'The Vatican Library and the Counter-Reformation'

5pm, Lecture Theatre, Weston Library

5: 'Urbs et orbis: popes and printers'. Book tickets here (free but space is limited).

 

In other news: 

The CEMS conference Mimesis on Trial takes place at Merton this Saturday, 20 May - there's still time to register!

Registration is also now open for our second conference, Cultures of Collecting, 1500-1750 (14 June 2017).

"Demons Land: A Poem Come True" is a collaborative artistic project inspired by Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene and led by Professor Simon Palfrey, with an event at National Trust Stowe taking place 15 June 2017.

In the TLS (and apropos of the excellent New Oxford Shakespeare roundtable that took place last week), Emma Smith on Shakespeare the apex predator:

 

 

Another week packed full of Early Modern seminars, events, and announcements at Oxford!

 

Monday 8 May

  • New Pespectives in Mediterranean History

11:15am, Old Common Room, Balliol College

Nenad Filipović (Oriental Institute, Sarajevo): ‘ 'Tis Pity She’s a Whore: An attempt at a microhistorical reading of an early 16th-century Ottoman petition’

  • 'Terminus or Renovation? Francis Bacon and Crisis in Early Modern Knowledge'

5pm, History Faculty, Colin Matthew Room

The TORCH Crisis, Extremes, and Apocalypse network are hosting a talk on 'Terminus or Renovation? Francis Bacon and Crisis in Early Modern Knowledge' with Dr Richard Serjeantson (University of Cambridge). More information here.

  • Oxford Bibliographic Society

5.15pm, Christ Church Upper Library 

David Rundle (Corpus Christi College, Oxford): 'More than a house for books: collecting and Christ Church library'

 

Tuesday 9 May

  • Early Modern Catholicism Seminar

​5pm, Wolfson College, Seminar Room 3

Stefan Bauer (University of York): 'Sforza Pallavicino: Writing the History of the Council of Trent'

  • The Lyell Lectures: Paul Nelles (Carleton): 'The Vatican Library and the Counter-Reformation'

5pm, Lecture Theatre, Weston Library

2: 'Cardinals and councils'. Book tickets for this and subsequent lectures here (free but space is limited).

  • Early Modern Literature Seminar

5.15pm, Ertegun House

The New Oxford Shakespeare (2016): Panel discussion with Rhodri Lewis, Laurie Maguire, Emma Smith and Adam Smyth

  • New Perspectives on the Psalms: A Series of Public Lectures

6.15pm, Ursell Room, Pusey House, St Giles

Henrike Lahnemann: 'Singing the Psalms in 16th-century Germany'

 

Wednesday 10 May

  • Literature and History in Early Modern England

​12.15pm, Lecture Room 6, New College

Niall Allsopp (Oriel College, Oxford), ‘“One False Tenet in the Political Philosophy”: Hobbes and Cowley’s Poems (1656)’

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5.00pm, Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Hamish Roberts (St Antony’s): 'Politicised Millennialism in the Late Eighteenth-Century British Empire'

  • Seminar in Early Modern European History

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Jan Kvetina (Charles University Prague): 'Political Dialogues and Republican Discourses in the Polis-Lithuanian Commonwealth'

  • Seminar in the History of Pre-Modern Science

5pm, All Souls College, Old Library 

Ian Maclean (All Souls College, Oxford), ‘Girolamo Cardano’s De prudentia eximia et artificiosa (1576): mathematics and decision-making’

 

Thursday 11 May

  • Religion in the British Isles, 1400-1700

5pm, Gibbs Room, Keble College (in the basement of the Warden’s Lodging: access via the main entrance of the College and Porters’ Lodge, Keble Road).

Colin Armstrong (Queen’s University, Belfast):  ‘A Laudian in Ulster: The Irish career of Jeremy Taylor, 1658-1667’

  • The Lyell Lectures: Paul Nelles (Carleton): 'The Vatican Library and the Counter-Reformation'

5pm, Lecture Theatre, Weston Library

3: 'An eternal archive'. Book tickets for this and subsequent lectures here (free but space is limited).

  • Early Modern French Seminar

5.15pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Julia Prest (St Andrews): "Créole Imitations: The Politics of Dance in pre-Revolutionary Saint-Domingue" 

 

In other news: 

Registration deadline approaches for the upcoming CEMS conference Mimesis on Trial (20 May 2017) - book before 10 May to register for the conference dinner, and ideally by 12 May to attend (registration will remain open but we would appreciate having numbers for catering). 

Registration is also open for 'Digitizing the Stage: Rethinking the Early Modern Theatre Archive' (10-12 July) and 'Corpus Christi College in Context, c.1450-1650' (6-9 September).

Call for papers for a new seminar series on 'Instruments of the Eighteenth Century'. 

 

 

Ringing in the month of May, this week features the beginning of the Lyell Lectures as well as a far-ranging line-up of other events.

 

Monday 1 May

  • New Pespectives in Mediterranean History

11:15am, Old Common Room, Balliol College 

Dr Elizabeth Key Fowden (Cambridge): ‘Plato’s throne and Solomon’s temple: Graeco-Islamic historical imagination in Ottoman Athens’

  • Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

5.15pm, Old Hall, Mansfield College (note alternative venue)

POSTER DISPLAY WORKSHOP: Graduates and Postdocs present their research through posters and discussion (all welcome).

 

Tuesday 2 May

  • Early Modern Graduate Forum

5.15pm, History of the Book Room, St. Cross Building

Ellen Ellis: "Inked, Intent and Fervent: Elizabeth Blake/Berkeley/Burnet and her Spiritual Diary"

Deborah Ramkhelawan: "'Dear Sister Moll': Reading Mary Evelyn’s Childhood Correspondence"​

 

Wednesday 3 May

  • Literature and History in Early Modern England

​12.15pm, Lecture Room 6, New College

Ruth Ahnert (Queen Mary University of London), ‘Metadata, Surveillance and the Tudor State: Digital Methods and the State Papers Archive’

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5pm., Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Geraldine Porter (Merton): '"All the reserve of his family, and all the dignity of his ancestors": Elite Political Families in the Eighteenth-Century Houses of Parliament'

  • Seminar in the History of Pre-Modern Science

5pm, All Souls College, Old Library 

Sonja Brentjes (Max Planck Institute, Berlin): ‘Teaching the sciences, medicine and philosophy at madrasas and mosques (12th-17th centuries)’

 

Thursday 4 May

  • Religion in the British Isles, 1400-1700

5pm, Gibbs Room, Keble College (in the basement of the Warden’s Lodging: access via the main entrance of the College and Porters’ Lodge, Keble Road).

Leif Dixon (Regent’s Park, Oxford): 'The Ranter Mood: Thinking about Theology and Emotions in Regicidal England'

  • The Lyell Lectures: Paul Nelles (Carleton):  'The Vatican Library and the Counter-Reformation'

5pm, Lecture Theatre, Weston Library

1: 'Libraries, Space and Power'. Book tickets for this and subsequent lectures here (free but space is limited).

 

In other news: 

Registration remains open for the upcoming CEMS conference Mimesis on Trial (20 May 2017) - the deadline to register for the conference dinner is 10 May. The final programme and registration for our second conference, Cultures of Collecting (14 June 2017) is also coming soon.

Further afield, registration is open for Bodies in Motion in the Early Modern World at King's (16 June 2017) and the biennial Society of Renaissance Studies conference next year at Sheffield (3-5 July 2018), featuring keynotes from our own Professors Emma Smith and Lyndal Roper. 

 

 

And just like that we're about to begin another term, which means the return of regular blogs! This week we have an exciting line-up of Early Modern seminars to ease you back into things, as well as a number of conference and other announcements below. As ever, we'd also love to hear about your news and publications, particularly if you'd like to write a guest post.

 

Monday 24 April

  • New Pespectives in Mediterranean History

11:15am, Old Common Room, Balliol College 

Sir Noel Malcolm (All Souls): ‘Tracking a transnational family in the sixteenth-century Mediterranean world: the Brunis and the Brutis’

 

Tuesday 25 April

  • Early Modern Catholicism Seminar

​5pm, Wolfson College, Seminar Room 3

Liesbeth Corens (University of Cambridge): 'Counter-Archives and creating communities: early modern English Catholic collecting' 

  • Early Modern Literature Seminar

5.15pm, Ertegun House

Pascale Aebischer (University of Exeter): 'Viewing in the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse: Social Division and Anamorphic Vision'

  • New Perspectives on the Psalms: A Series of Public Lectures

6.15pm, Ursell Room, Pusey House, St Giles

Henrike Lahnemann: 'Singing the Psalms in 16th-century Germany'

 

Wednesday 26 April

  • Literature and History in Early Modern England

​12.15pm, Lecture Room 6, New College

Jennifer Bishop (Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge), ‘Civic Writing: Cultures of Record-Keeping in Early Modern London’

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

4:30pm., Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Joint-Session with the Global History Seminar

William Pettigrew and the PEIC group (Kent): 'Transoceanic Constitutions: The Corporation as a Protagonist in Global History, c.1550-1750'

  • Seminar in Early Modern European History

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Helen Watanabe O’Kelly (Oxford): 'Queens Consort, European Court Culture and Cultural Transfer'

  • Seminar in the History of Pre-Modern Science

5pm, All Souls College, Old Library 

Rob Iliffe (Linacre College, Oxford): ‘Fear and loathing of the imagination: the religious foundations of anti-hypotheticalism in early modern natural philosophy’

 

Thursday 27 April

  • Key Words in Early Modern French Culture Seminar

3.30pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Jean-Alexandre Perras (Jesus College): “Génie” 

  • Religion in the British Isles, 1400-1700

5pm, Gibbs Room, Keble College (in the basement of the Warden’s Lodging: access via the main entrance of the College and Porters’ Lodge, Keble Road).

Peter McCullough (Lincoln College, Oxford): 'Lancelot Andrewes' Reformation Inheritance: The Only Way Is Essex'

  • Early Modern French Seminar

5.15pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Graduate Showcase

 

In other news: 

Registration is now open for the upcoming CEMS conference Mimesis on Trial (20 May 2017) - the deadline to register for the conference dinner is 10 May. We hope you'll join us!

Further afield, registration is also open until 8 May for "Cultures of Exclusion in the Early Modern World" at the University of Warwick (18-19 May).

The Call for Papers for a conference on "Retailing and Distribution in the Seventeenth Century" at the University of Wolverhampton closes 27 April.

And finally, several members of CEMS are in the Times Literary Supplement this week discussing "Remaking Shakespeare":

 

 

 

Hilary Term 2017

Expand All

 

As another term comes to a close, why not celebrate with some Early Modern seminars (and one postgraduate conference)? Over the vacation, we will be continuing to announce upcoming events on this blog and on our Twitter (@OxfordCEMS). Please do get in touch with any seminar schedules and announcements for Trinity term, and particularly if you'd like to write a short blog post on your research or an upcoming event/publication!

 

Monday 6 March

  • Bodleian Master Classes in Early Modern Manuscripts

2.15pm, Horton Room, Weston Library (Level 1) 

Daniel Smith (KCL): 'A manuscript of John Donne's 'Goodfriday' from the collection of Robert S. Pirie – poor memorial reconstruction, or authorial early version?

  • Italian Renaissance Seminar

5pm, St Catherine’s College

Jim Harris (Ashmolean Museum), Peter Dent (University of Bristol, Dept of Art History): ‘Ghiberti’s Commentarii: A Guide to Looking’ 

  • All Souls College Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

5.00–6.45pm, All Souls, Hovenden Room

Jill Kraye (Warburg Institute, London): ‘What does Renaissance humanism have to do with Renaissance philosophy?’ 

  • Besterman Enlightenment Workshop

5pm Voltaire Foundation (99 Banbury Road)

Laurence Brockliss (University of Oxford): ‘The Lure of Paris: The Republic of Letters and Eighteenth-Century Speed-Dating’

  • Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

5:15pm, Old Library, Hertford College

Professor Abigail Williams (St Peter's College): 'Reading and Sociability in the Eighteenth-Century Home'

  • Oxford Bibliographic Society

5.15pm, Weston Library, Lecture Theatre

Emma Smith: 'Marital Marginalia: The Books of Thomas and Isabella Hervey (ca 1675–1694)'

 

Tuesday 7 March

  • Early Modern Catholicism Seminar

​5pm, Wolfson College, Seminar Room 3

John Hunt (Utah Valley): 'Wagering on the Red Hat: Gambling on the Promotion of Cardinals in Sixteenth-Century Rome'

  • Early Modern Graduate Forum

5.15pm, St Cross Building, History of the Book Room

Deborah Ramkhelawan: "'Dear Sister Moll': Reading Mary Evelyn’s Childhood Correspondence"
Emily Jennings: "'Balaam's Asse': Apocalypse, Treason, and the Politics of Interpretation in Mid-Jacobean Britain"

 

Wednesday 8 March

  • Early Modern German Culture: An Interdisciplinary Seminar

2pm, Gerry Martin Room, History Faculty (followed by afternoon tea).  

Jan Zdichynec (Charles University, Prague): ‘Abbesses – Nuns – Monks. Disciplining, Communication and Culture in the Cistercian nunneries of Early Modern Upper Lusatia’

Petr Hrachovec (Institute of History, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic): ‘Parish, Piety and Providence. The Case of Early Modern Zittau’

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5 p.m.,  Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Alice Martin (Mount Stuart Trust): 'Mount Stuart: Scotland's Treasure House Past, Present and Future'

  • Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Rebekah Higgitt (University of Kent): 'Communicating Longitude after Harrison: the Board of Longitude in the late eighteenth century'

  • Late Medieval Europe Seminar: Paper and Parchment

5pm, St John’s College, New Seminar Room

Final discussion and display of early books in St John’s College Library. ​

 

Thursday 9 March

  • Traditions in Motion: The Circulation of Texts, 1100-1900

2.15pm, Quarrell Room, Exeter College

Krisztina Szilágyi (University of Cambridge): "The Story of ‘Antar in Jewish and Christian Manuscripts"
 
  • Early Modern British History Seminar

5pm in The Breakfast Room, Merton College (tea from 4.45)

Graduate student presentations:

Chloe Ingersent (Oriel), '(En)Gendering violence in sixteenth-century England'

Joseph Newall (St Cross), ‘A Greate Offendor in His Kind of Writinge': Archbishop Laud and the Prosecution of William Prynne’s Histrio-mastix, 1633–4’

Thomas Pert (Lincoln), 'The Palatine Family c. 1632-48: Experiences of exile in the Thirty Years' War'

William White (St Anne’s), 'Politics and Religion in the Sermons of the Royalist Clergy, 1642-1662'

Micheline Astley-Boden (Christ Church), ‘Religious Violence During the English Civil War’

Hayley Ross (St John’s),"'Popery' and Conscience in Late Seventeenth-Century Anti-Catholic Texts’

  • Thomas Middleton, 'A Trick to Catch the Old One'

4pm, English Faculty

Lectures by Harry McCarthy and Laurie Maguire.

7:30pm, Simpkins Lee Theatre, Lady Margaret Hall

Performance by Edward's Boys: tickets available here.

 

Friday 10 March

  • Prison/Exile: Controlled Spaces in Early Modern Europe

​Two-day conference (10-11 March), Ertegun House

See the conference website for programme and more information. Free registration is open until 8 March. 

  • The Seminar in the History of the Book

2.15pm, in the Weston Library, Visiting Scholars’ Centre (Level 2)

Professor Rodolfo Savelli, Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza, Università di Genova: 'Printing the Corpus iuris civilis in the Sixteenth Century'

 

In other news:

The abstract deadline for our upcoming conference, "Mimesis on Trial" is 15 March; abstracts for "Cultures of Collecting, 1550-1700" will be accepted until 10 April. Please see the Conferences page for more information on both.

Next week, 13-14 March, the Oxford Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy is hosting a free two-day conference on "Philosophy of/and Education": programme and registration information here.

Registration is also open for the conference 'After Chichele: Intellectual and Cultural Dynamics of the English Church, 1443 to 1517' taking place at St. Anne's College 28-30 June

Finally, enjoy the springtime and don't forget to go outside once in a while...

St Jerome in his Study

 

 

Along with the regular schedule of seminars and events, there are a number of announcements and calls for papers this week - see below!

 

Monday 27 February

  • Italian Renaissance Seminar

5pm, St Catherine’s College

Marco Gentile (Università degli Studi di Parma, Dept of History): ‘The Count’s Funeral. Rural Lordship and the City in Fifteenth-Century Lombardy’ 

  • E.A. Lowe Lectures in Palaeography 3: 'The Fox and the Bees; the First Century of the Library of Corpus Christi College' 

5pm, MBI Al Jaber Auditorium, Corpus Christi College

Professor Rod Thomson, 'The Library They Produced'

  • All Souls College Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

5.00–6.45pm, All Souls, Hovenden Room 

Mara van der Lugt (Göttingen): ‘The good, the bad, and the ugly: the problem of evil in early modern philosophy’ 

  • Besterman Enlightenment Workshop

5 p.m. Voltaire Foundation (99 Banbury Road)

Andrew Kahn (University of Oxford): ‘The Enlightenment Radicalism of Alexander Radishchev’ 

  • Oxford Bibliographic Society

5.15pm, Weston Library, Lecture Theatre

Adam Smyth: "Tatters allegoricall’: reading and not reading printed waste in early modern books"

 

Tuesday 28 February

  • Early Modern Catholicism Seminar

​5pm, Wolfson College, Seminar Room 3

John Hunt (Utah Valley): 'Wagering on the Red Hat: Gambling on the Promotion of Cardinals in Sixteenth-Century Rome'

  • Early Modern Literature Seminar

5.15pm, Ertegun House

Sophie Read (Cambridge), “Spiceworld: God & the Metaphysics of Scent in some Seventeenth-Century Poetry"

 

Wednesday 1 March

  • Engaging with the Humanities

​12.15pm, Saïd Business School, Park End Street

Professor Ben Morgan, 'Shakespeare's Conviviality'

Registration is required for this event; see here for more information.

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5 p.m.,  Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

William Ashworth (Liverpool): 'The Gifts of Athena Revisited: Protectionism, Regulation and the British Industrial Revolution, 1700-1800'

  • Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Clara Silvia Roero (University of Turin): 'M.G. Agnesi (1718–1799): The first Italian woman to write a treatise of calculus' 

  • Late Medieval Europe Seminar: Paper and Parchment

5 pm, St John’s College, New Seminar Room

Torsten Hiltmann (University of Münster): 'Coats of Arms in Books and Beyond: The Objectivation of Heraldry and Its Materiality'

 

Thursday 2 March

  • Democracy and its Discontents: Rousseau, Robespierre, Paine

12.15pm, TORCH, Radcliffe Humanities Building

Olivier Tonneau (University of Cambridge): 'Justice as prudence: Robespierre's struggle to prevent terror (1789-1792)'

Yannick Bosc (Rouen): 'Thomas Paine and Robespierre: the Terror of the Rights of Man'

Daniel Thévenon (University of Cambridge): 'Rousseau, Freedom and the French Revolution'

See here for more information.

  • Traditions in Motion: The Circulation of Texts, 1100-1900

2.15pm, Quarrell Room, Exeter College

Thomas Roebuck (University of East Anglia): "Thomas Smith (1638-1710) and His Journey to the Levant: Continuities and Transformations in Oriental Scholarship"

  • Key Words in Early Modern French Culture Seminar

3.30pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Jean-Alexandre Perras (Jesus College): “Génie” 

  • Early Modern British History Seminar

5pm in The Breakfast Room, Merton College (tea from 4.45)

Graduate student presentations:

Emily Glassford (Lincoln), ‘Excess, Corruption, and Sin: Cultural Stereotypes of Strangers in London and at the English Court, c. 1450-1558'

Joel Butler (Wadham), 'The Levant Company and Anglo-Ottoman Diplomacy in the sixteenth century: Re-Orienting Perspectives’

Christopher Gausden (Jesus), ‘The English View of the Scottish Court, 1594: The Baptism of Prince Henry’

Michael Heimos (St Cross), ‘In the night the heart doeth wander…’ – Koheleth and Expression, Practical Divinity, and Community in England, 1585 – 1603’

Matthew Ward (Kellogg), 'The political and religious thought of John Vesey: a chapter in the Anglo-Irish reception of Thomas Hobbes'

  • Early Modern French Seminar

5.15pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

David LaGuardia (Dartmouth College): 'On the Practices of Memory: The Case of Jeanne d’Albret and Catherine de Médicis'

Friday 3 March

  • The Seminar in the History of the Book

2.15pm, in the Weston Library, Visiting Scholars’ Centre (Level 2)

Dr Paul Needham, Scheide Library, Princeton University Library: 'The Gutenberg Bible in the Context of Fifteenth-Century Manuscript Bibles'

  • Getting Your Hands Dirty With the Digital Manuscripts Toolkit

3-5pm, Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library

Spaces are limited and advance registration is required; see here for more information.

 

In other news: 

CEMS has launched a Call for Papers for another one-day conference, titled "Cultures of Collecting, 1500-1750" (14 June 2017, CFP deadline 10 April). We are also still accepting abstracts for "Mimesis on Trial" (20 May 2017), with the deadline coming up 15 March -- please see here for more information on both and email your abstracts to natasha.simonova@ell.ox.ac.uk .

The Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar is looking for DPhil students and postdocs to present posters about their research: details can be found here; the deadline for expressions of interest is 11 March, coinciding with the TORCH humanities poster competition.

Registration is now open for the Prison/Exile: Controlled Spaces in Early Modern Europe conference taking place at Ertegun House 10-11 March. 

Registration also is open for a conference on The Book Index (22-23 June 2017) hosted by the Centre for the History of the Book.

Ole Worm's Museum

 

 

As well as the first two E.A. Lowe Lectures in Palaeography at Corpus Christi College (whose founder enjoined its scholars to be like "ingenious bees" creating wax and honey day and night), this week features all manner of seminars for the cross-pollination of ideas.

Monday 20 February

  • Bodleian Master Classes in Early Modern Manuscripts

2.15pm, Horton Room, Weston Library (Level 1) 

Justin Begley (Oxford): 'Margaret Cavendish in the Bodleian: Gifts, Corrections, and Annotations'

  • Italian Renaissance Seminar

5pm, St Catherine’s College

James Shaw (University of Sheffield, Dept of History): ‘Women as creditors, debtors and intermediaries: the informal economy of credit in seventeenth-century Venice’ 

  • All Souls College Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

5.00–6.45pm, All Souls, Hovenden Room

Catherine Wilson (York and All Souls College, Oxford): ‘The image of man in the Comte de Buffon’ 

  • Besterman Enlightenment Workshop

5pm Voltaire Foundation (99 Banbury Road)

Kate Marsh (University of Liverpool): ‘Enlightenment from India? France, India and Global Exchanges, c. 1721-99’ 

  • Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

5:15pm, Old Library, Hertford College

Dr Aaron Hanlon (Colby College): 'Fanny Hill and the Enlightenment History of Pain'

 

Tuesday 21 February

  • Centre for Socio-Legal Studies Legalism Seminar

4.30pm, Wolfson College

Martin Ingram  (Faculty of History, University of Oxford) 'Manners and Morals: Codes of Civility in Early Modern England'

  • Early Modern Catholicism Seminar

​5pm, Wolfson College, Seminar Room 3

Jane Stevens Crawshaw (Oxford Brookes): 'Cleaning the streets: the changing place of prostitution and piety in Renaissance Genoa'

  • Early Modern Graduate Forum

5.15pm, St Cross Building, History of the Book Room

Christopher Gausden: "Laelius: Sir Henry Lee (1533-1611), Literature and Politics"
Andrea Davidson: "Women Against Redemptive Suffering: Transverberation and the Nightingale in Aemilia Lanyer's Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum"

 

Wednesday 22 February

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5 p.m.,  Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Elaine Tierney (Victoria and Albert Museum): 'Producing the City: Festival Design and 'Middlemen' in London and Paris, 1660-1715'

  • Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Benjamin Wardhaugh (University of Oxford): 'Success, failure and change in Georgian mathematics’ 

  • Late Medieval Europe Seminar: Paper and Parchment

5pm, St John’s College, New Seminar Room

Stephen Milner (University of Manchester): 'Book Cultures: Forensic Science and Textual Hermeneutics'

  • The Medieval and Renaissance Research Cluster of Keble’s Advanced Studies Centre presents

'Healthy Sleep and the Early Modern Household'

Dr Sasha Handley, University of Manchester

Dr Handley’s most recent monograph, Sleep in Early Modern England, explores the evolution in patterns and practices of sleep, examining particularly the ways in which accepted notions of sleep were challenged by medical thinking in the mid-seventeenth century. Arguing that sleep is as dependent on culture as it is on biological and environmental factors, Dr Handley’s research reveals the way our notions of health, the body, magic, and science have intertwined and collided over our history.

Gibbs Room, Keble College

  • E.A. Lowe Lectures in Palaeography: 'The Fox and the Bees; the First Century of the Library of Corpus Christi College' 

5pm, MBI Al Jaber Auditorium, Corpus Christi College

Professor Rod Thomson, 'The Founder as Shaping Force: Richard Fox and his Books'

Professor Thomson is Emeritus Professor of Medieval History at the University of Tasmania.  He has written extensively about books, libraries and learning in medieval Europe, with special attention to the monk and scholar William of Malmesbury.  He has compiled six descriptive catalogues of medieval manuscripts in English collections.

 

Thursday 23 February

  • Traditions in Motion: The Circulation of Texts, 1100-1900

2.15pm, Quarrell Room, Exeter College

Philipp Nothaft (All Souls): 'Franciscan Hebraism and Calendar Improvement in the Second Half of the Thirteenth Century'
 
  • Early Modern British History Seminar

5pm in The Breakfast Room, Merton College (tea from 4.45)

Sir John Holt: Courts, Corporations and the Crafting of the Constitutional Landscape after 1688 
Preparatory reading: P. Halliday, Dismembering the Body Politic: Partisan Politics in England's Towns 1650-1730 (1998), esp. ch. 8; H. Nenner, By Colour of Law, Legal Culture and Constitutional Politics in England, 1660-1689 (1977); P. Hamburger, ‘Revolution and Judicial Review: Chief Justice Holt's Opinion in City of London v. Wood’, Columbia Law Review, 94 (1994), 2091-2153. 
George Artley (University of Oxford)

  • Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

5-7pm, All Souls, Wharton Room

Uri Smilansky (King’s College, London): 'Drugs, Sex, Medieval Cultural Politics and the Learned Musicians of 18th Century Paris: Surviving the Centuries as a Machaut Manuscript'

 

Friday 24 February

  • The Seminar in the History of the Book

2.15pm, in the Weston Library, Visiting Scholars’ Centre (Level 2)

Dr David Speranzi, Firenze, Istituto Nazionale di Studi sul Rinascimento: 'Greek Script and Type in the Fifteenth century. Demetrius Damilas between Milan and Florence'

  • E.A. Lowe Lectures in Palaeography 2: 'The Fox and the Bees; the First Century of the Library of Corpus Christi College' 

5pm, MBI Al Jaber Auditorium, Corpus Christi College

Professor Rod Thomson, 'The First President as Fox's Instrument: John Claymond's Donations'

 

 

 

As we pass the halfway point of term, escape the cold and the Week 5 blues with Early Modern seminars across a wide range of disciplines:

Monday 13 February

  • Italian Renaissance Seminar

5pm, St Catherine’s College

Julian Gardner (University of Warwick, Dept of Art History): ‘Moving Pictures: Cardinals in Copes’ 

  • All Souls College Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

5.00–6.45pm, All Souls, Hovenden Room (access is via the entrance to the College on the High Street – please ask at the porter’s lodge for further directions, or consult the information at www.asc.ox.ac.uk/visiting-the-college).

Theodor Dunkelgrun (CRASSH, Cambridge): 'Two concepts of purity: limpieza de sangre and hebraica veritas in Renaissance Spain’ 

  • Besterman Enlightenment Workshop

5 p.m. Voltaire Foundation (99 Banbury Road)

Ritchie Robertson (University of Oxford): Discussion of Isaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment, ed. by Laurence Brockliss and Ritchie Robertson (OUP, 2016) 

 

Tuesday 14 February

  • Centre for Socio-Legal Studies Legalism Seminar

4.30pm, Wolfson College

Jan Lorenz (Department of Anthropology, Adam Mickiewicz University): 'Within the law: The ethical and legal aspects of Polish conversions to Judaism'

  • Early Modern Literature Seminar

5.15pm, Ertegun House

Simon Smith (Birmingham), “Playgoing, Pleasure and Judgement in Early Modern England”

 

Wednesday 15 February

  • 'Senses and Sensations' Graduate Study Group 

12pm, Chough Room, St Edmund Hall

How do texts convey sounds or smells, shock or shame? How are the most subjective of bodily experiences, from sweet tastes to bitter pain, expressed in literature? There’s nothing to read in advance: just turn up ready to see, hear, and share ideas from across all time periods. (Please feel free to bring your lunch, to eat while we discuss!) All welcome. 

Week 5 discussion: 'Sight and the early modern stage' 

  • 'Reading Images' Workshops at the Ashmolean Museum

​1pm, New Douce Room, Ashmolean

Alice Little (DPhil Music, University of Oxford): 'Collecting Places: John Malchair’s drawings of eighteenth-century Oxford in the context of his music collecting'

  • Early Modern German Culture: An Interdisciplinary Seminar

2pm, Gerry Martin Room, History Faculty (followed by afternoon tea).  

Allison Stielau (UCL), ‘Souvenir of Siege: The Early Modern Notklippe’

Hannah Murphy (KCL), ‘The Arts of Measurement in Early Modern Germany’

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5 p.m.,  Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Eleanor Bland (Sheffield): 'Policing and the Identification of Offenders in Metropolitan London, 1780-1850'

  • Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Simon Schaffer (University of Cambridge): 'British orientalism and the exactitude of Indian sciences'

  • Late Medieval Europe Seminar: Paper and Parchment

5 pm, St John’s College, New Seminar Room

Stella Panayotova (Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge): 'Painting on Parchment'

 

Thursday 16 February

  • ‘What’s so early modern about the Early Modern World?’, a round-table discussion with opening reflections by John Darwin (Nuffield), Christopher Markiewicz (Exeter), Christine Woodhead (Durham), and John-Paul Ghobrial (Balliol).

11:15am, in the Old Common Room, Balliol College. 

Pre-circulated readings can be obtained from john-paul.ghobrial@history.ox.ac.uk:

Jack A. Goldstone, ‘The Problem of the “Early Modern” World’, Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient 41.3 (1998), 249-284.

Sanjay Subrahmanyam, ‘Connected Histories: Notes towards a Reconfiguration of Early Modern Eurasia’, Modern Asian Studies 31.3 (July 1997), 735-762.

  • Key Words in Early Modern French Culture Seminar

3.30pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Edward Nye (Lincoln College): “Pre-Romanticism” 

  • Early Modern British History Seminar

5pm in The Breakfast Room, Merton College (tea from 4.45)

Loyalist Catholicism Reconsidered: Sir Thomas Tresham and the Elizabethan regime in the 1580s 
Preparatory reading:S. Kaushik, 'Resistance, loyalty and recusant politics: Sir Thomas Tresham and the Elizabethan state’ , Midland History 21 (1996), 37-72; E. Rose, Cases of Conscience: alternatives open to recusants and Puritans under Elizabeth I and James I (1975) esp. ch. 4; G. Kilroy, Edmund Campion: a scholarly Life (2015), esp. chs. 6, 9, & 11. 
Katie McKeogh (University of Oxford)

  • Early Modern French Seminar

5.15pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Kate Tunstall (University of Oxford): "The Making of Diderot-philosophe, 1765-82” 

  • Literature and Medicine Seminar

6.15pm, Green Templeton College,  Abrahams lecture theatre

Laurie Maguire (University of Oxford): 'Imitating Illness, Imitating Plays: VolponeOthello and King Lear.'

 

In other news: 

The @OxfordCEMS Twitter feed continues to be your daily one-stop shop for Early Modern events, announcements, conference CFPs, and the occasional pretty picture. As we approach 1000 followers, we welcome suggestions for what we should do to celebrate!

 

It's busy week for Early Modern research, with a number of new and one-off events across a range of time-periods and disciplines listed below! As always, please get in touch if there's anything you'd like to see featured, or if you're interested in writing a blog post to share your news or work in progress.

 

Monday 6 February

  • The Relation of Literature and Learning to Social Hierarchy in Early Modern Europe

2.00pm (ending by 3.30pm), Wharton Room, All Souls College

Richard McCabe (Merton College, Oxford): Literary Patronage and Hierarch

Lisa Sampson (UCL): Learning and Theatre in the Italian Academies

  • The third annual joint Classics and English lecture: APGRD Public Lecture

2.15pm, Ioannou Centre Lecture Theatre, 66 St Giles'. Free, all welcome, no booking required.

Victoria Moul (KCL), ‘The Other Muse: Latin and English Poetry in the Seventeenth Century’

  • Bodleian Master Classes in Early Modern Manuscripts

2.15pm, Horton Room, Weston Library (Level 1) 

Chris Fletcher (Bodleian): '"Good Mr Wagstaffe": a project team presentation showcasing new electronic student editions of early modern letters in the Bodleian'

  • Italian Renaissance Seminar

5pm, St Catherine’s College

Hannah Kinney (University of Oxford, Dept of Art History): ‘Originality and Ownership in Grand Ducal Florence’ 

  • All Souls College Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

5.00–6.45pm, All Souls, Hovenden Room (access is via the entrance to the College on the High Street – please ask at the porter’s lodge for further directions, or consult the information at www.asc.ox.ac.uk/visiting-the-college).

Niccolo Guicciardini: ‘The publication of Newton’s Opera omnia in Geneva and Lausanne (1739–1761): a chapter in the reception of Newtonianism’ 

  • Besterman Enlightenment Workshop

5pm Voltaire Foundation (99 Banbury Road)

Paul Monod (Middlebury College): ‘Voltaire and the Jacobites, 1722-1733’ 

  • Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

5:15pm, Old Library, Hertford College

Dr Ryan Hanley (New College, Oxford): '"The poor woman's fair fame and reputation": Mary Prince, Slavery, and the Celebrity of Victimhood'

 

Tuesday 7 February

  • Early Modern Catholicism Seminar

​5pm, Wolfson College, Seminar Room 3

Aislinn Muller (Cambridge): 'Regnans in Excelsis and Catholic Missions to England'

  • Early Modern Graduate Forum

5.15pm, St Cross Building, History of the Book Room

Natalya Din-Kariuki: "Making Friends in Strange Places: Henry Blount's Voyage into the Levant (1636) and the Rhetoric of Similitude"
Ben Wilkinson-Turnbull: "Grave Matters: New Interpretations of Mary Lady Chudleigh’s 'Epitaph'"

 

Wednesday 8 February

  • 'Senses and Sensations' Graduate Study Group 

12pm, Chough Room, St Edmund Hall

How do texts convey sounds or smells, shock or shame? How are the most subjective of bodily experiences, from sweet tastes to bitter pain, expressed in literature? There’s nothing to read in advance: just turn up ready to see, hear, and share ideas from across all time periods. (Please feel free to bring your lunch, to eat while we discuss!) All welcome. 

Week 4 discussion: Performing sound in Thomas Tomkis’ Lingua (c. 1607). 

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5 p.m.,  Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Emma Page (Kellogg): 'Place and Power: the Landed Gentry of the West Solent Region in the Eighteenth Century'

  • Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Richard Oosterhoff (University of Cambridge): 'Reforming Mathematical Physics in Renaissance Paris’ 

  • Late Medieval Europe Seminar: Paper and Parchment

5pm, St John’s College, New Seminar Room

Katrin Kogman Appel (University of Münster / Ben-Gurion University of the Negev): 'The Manuscript/Print Age in Jewish Book History: The Different Audiences of the Illustrated Passover Haggadah'

 

Thursday 9 February

  • Traditions in Motion: The Circulation of Texts, 1100-1900

2.15pm, Quarrell Room, Exeter College

Peter Hill (Christ Church College, Oxford): "The First Arabic Translations of Enlightenment Literature: Syrians, Greeks and Franks in Damietta, 1808-1818"

  • Early Modern British History Seminar

5pm in The Breakfast Room, Merton College (tea from 4.45)

Charles I's most loyal subject: Thomas Harrison and the Sin of Uzzah 
Preparatory reading: ‘The trial of Thomas Harrison,’ in Cobbett’s Complete Collection of State Trials, vol. 3 (1809), 1369-82; Noel Malcolm, ‘Thomas Harrison and his “Ark of Studies”: An Episode in the History of the Organization of Knowledge’, Seventeenth Century, 19 (2004), 196-232; .David Cressy, Charles I and the People of England (Oxford, 2015), pp. 177-209 (‘Importunate Petitioners’); 2 Samuel 6: 1-7 or 1 Chronicles 13: 7-11. 
Prof David Cressy (Claremont Graduate University and Christ Church)

  • Seminar in Medieval and Renaissance Music

5-7pm, All Souls, Wharton Room

Christian Thomas Leitmeir (Magdalen College), ‘The Mendicants and the Motet’

 

Friday 10 February

  • The Seminar in the History of the Book

2.15pm, in the Weston Library, Visiting Scholars’ Centre (Level 2)

Dr Jeremiah Dittmar, Department of Economics, London School of Economics: 'The Price of Books in Early Modern Europe: An Economic Perspective'

 

In other news:

The Lexicons of Early Modern English project at the University of Toronto is now open access, allowing you to search a large variety of dictionaries published between 1480 and 1755. 

 

 

 

Monday 30 January

  • Italian Renaissance Seminar

5pm, St Catherine’s College

Diana Presciutti (University of Essex, Dept of Art History): ‘Marble, Grisaille, Print: Materials and Visual Hagiography in Renaissance Italy’ 

  • All Souls College Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

5.00–6.45pm, All Souls, Hovenden Room (access is via the entrance to the College on the High Street – please ask at the porter’s lodge for further directions, or consult the information at www.asc.ox.ac.uk/visiting-the-college).

Nicholas Hardy (University Library, Cambridge): ‘Biblical typology and Protestant scholarship, from Joseph Scaliger (d. 1609) to Jean Le Clerc (d. 1736)’ 

  • Besterman Enlightenment Workshop

5 p.m. Voltaire Foundation (99 Banbury Road)

Peter Jones (University of Birmingham): ‘Agricultural Enlightenment: the Knowledge-Based Approach to Growth in the Rural Economy, c. 1750-1840’ 

 

Tuesday 31 January

  • Centre for Socio-Legal Studies Legalism Seminar

4.30pm, Wolfson College

Andrew Simpson (School of Law, University of Aberdeen): 'The Invention of New Law in the Poetry of Sir Richard Maitland of Lethington (ca.1496–1586)'

  • Early Modern Literature Seminar

5.15pm, Ertegun House

Victoria van Hyning (Oxford), “English Convent Autobiography, 1630-1795”

 

Wednesday 1 February

  • 'Reading Images' Workshops at the Ashmolean Museum

​1pm, New Douce Room, Ashmolean

Vittoria Fallanca (DPhil Medieval and Modern Languages, University of Oxford): 'Thinking drawing differently (with some help from Boucher and Montaigne)'

  • Early Modern German Culture: An Interdisciplinary Seminar

2pm, Gerry Martin Room, History Faculty (followed by afternoon tea).  

Emilie Dosquet (IMHC, Paris),  'Of Fire and Ink: the Fabrication of the Desolation of the Palatinate (1688–9). On Some German Aspects of a European Event'  

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5 p.m.,  Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Alice Little (St. Cross): 'What did Oxford sound like in 1784? A Musical Snapshot based on the Tune Collections of J. B. Malchair'

  • Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Davide Crippa (Academy of Sciences, Prague): 'The controversy between Gregory and Huygens on the quadrature of the circle'

  • Late Medieval Europe Seminar: Paper and Parchment

5 pm, St John’s College, New Seminar Room

Cristina Dondi (Lincoln College): 'The Economic Dimension of Early Printing: Book Prices in Venice (1484-88), from the Zornale of Francesco de Madiis'

 

Thursday 2 February

  • Traditions in Motion: The Circulation of Texts, 1100-1900

2.15pm, Quarrell Room, Exeter College

Ada Rapoport-Albert (University College, London): "Trans-cultural Sectarians: The Messianic Cult of Jacob Frank and His Daughter in Eighteenth-Century Poland"

  • Key Words in Early Modern French Culture Seminar

3.30pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Catriona Seth (University of Oxford): “Salon” 

  • Early Modern British History Seminar

5pm in The Breakfast Room, Merton College (tea from 4.45)

"My Authority is Absolute”: Mapping the Political Landscape of Later Stuart Cornwall and South-West Wales 
Preparatory reading: D.W. Hayton, The House of Commons, 1690-1715: Introductory Survey (2002), pp. 124-31, 137-40; A.H. Dodd, Studies in Stuart Wales (1952), ch. 5. 
James Harris (University of Oxford)

  • Literature and Medicine Seminar

6.15pm, Green Templeton College,  Abrahams lecture theatre

Evelyn Welch,  Professor of Renaissance Studies at King’s College London, speaks about 'Renaissance Skin'

 

Friday 3 February

  • The Seminar in the History of the Book

2.15pm, in the Weston Library, Visiting Scholars’ Centre (Level 2)

Professor Stephen Oakley, Faculty of Classics, Cambridge University: 'Incunabular Stemmatics'

 

In other news: 

The Folger Shakespeare Library has launched the beta site of Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO), which provides transcriptions, metadata and images of manuscripts from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

The proposal deadline for "Mobility and Space in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe" is on Wednesday, 1 February -- see the conferences page for details.

CEMS' own Professor Rhodri Lewis is in the Times Literary Supplement with a topical contribution:

 

 

Thanks to everyone for your kind words about the new CEMS website, and to all who have submitted profiles to be affiliated with us -- we're particularly keen to hear from current DPhil students.

Here are all of the many Early Modern events taking place this week. As always, let us know if there's anything you'd like included in future round-ups, or if you'd like to write a blog post relating to a publication/event/your current research. 

 

Monday 23 January

  • Bodleian Master Classes in Early Modern Manuscripts

2.15pm, Horton Room, Weston Library (Level 1) 

Victoria Pickering (QMUL): 'Richard Richardson and his 'Botanick friends': Bodleian correspondence and natural history in the early eighteenth century'

  • Italian Renaissance Seminar

5pm, St Catherine’s College

Catherine Whistler (Ashmolean Museum, Dept of Western Art): ‘Drawing and Venice’ 

  • All Souls College Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

5.00–6.45pm, All Souls, Hovenden Room (access is via the entrance to the College on the High Street – please ask at the porter’s lodge for further directions, or consult the information at www.asc.ox.ac.uk/visiting-the-college).

Felix Waldmann (Christ’s College, Cambridge): ‘The Chair of Ethics in the University of Naples, 1703–69’ 

  • Besterman Enlightenment Workshop

5pm Voltaire Foundation (99 Banbury Road)

Vittoria Feola (Università degli Studi di Padova): ‘Prince Eugene of Savoy and the Radical Enlightenment: A Reappraisal’ 

  • Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture Seminar

5:15pm, Christ Church Library

Archive Workshop: The Brady Collection, Christ Church College Library (please congregate at the Library lobby 5pm) 

 

Tuesday 24 January

  • Centre for Socio-Legal Studies Legalism Seminar

4.30pm, Wolfson College

David d’Avray (Department of History, UCL): 'Social Systems and the Internal Legal Forum, with special reference to the Papal Penitentiary'

  • Early Modern Graduate Forum

5.15pm, St Cross Building, History of the Book Room

Edwina Christie: "Reading Seventeenth-Century Prose Romances"
Jonathon Iverson: "Philosophies of 'Taste' in English (and French) Cookery Books of the Seventeenth Century"

 

Wednesday 25 January

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5 p.m.,  Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Simon Lewis (University College): 'Early Anti-Methodism as a Disguise for Heterodoxy'

  • Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

David Rabouin (CNRS, Paris):  ‘A Fresh Look at Leibniz’s mathesis universalis’

  • Late Medieval Europe Seminar: Paper and Parchment

5pm, St John’s College, New Seminar Room

Oren Margolis (Somerville College): 'Divine Impressions: Aldus Manutius and Catherine of Siena'

 

Thursday 26 January

  • Traditions in Motion: The Circulation of Texts, 1100-1900

2.15pm, Quarrell Room, Exeter College

Alastair Hamilton (American University in Cairo): "Johann Michael Wansleben: an early use of Arabic sources in Ottoman Egypt"

  • Early Modern British History Seminar

5pm in The Breakfast Room, Merton College (tea from 4.45)

"The Country conquers it self” - The Idea of Conquest and the English Civil War 
Preparatory reading: John Pocock, The Ancient Constitution and the Feudal Law: a reissue with a retrospect, (1987); Quentin Skinner, Visions of Politics, (2002), Vol. 3, Ch. 8 (‘History and Ideology in the English Revolution’); Johann Sommerville, ‘History and Theory: the Norman Conquest in Early Stuart Political Thought’, Political Studies, 34 (1986), 249‐261. 
Jonas Pollex (University of Oxford)

Friday 27 January

  • The Seminar in the History of the Book

2.15pm, in the Weston Library, Visiting Scholars’ Centre (Level 2)

Dr Louis-Gabriel Bonicoli, Paris: 'Parisian Early Printed Book Illustration (around 1500)'

 

In other news:

"Shakespeare's World", one of many groundbreaking Early Modern projects at Oxford (and an excellent tool for palaeographic training and procrastination), was featured in The New Yorker:

 

 

As we kick off another term, here is a digest of the exciting Early Modern events taking place in Oxford this week. In addition, have a look at the newly-posted Call for Papers for the upcoming CEMS conference, "Mimesis on Trial" (deadline 15 March).

If there is anything you would like included in future round-ups, please drop us a line.

 

Monday 16 January

  • Italian Renaissance Seminar

5pm, St Catherine’s College

Heather Webb (University of Cambridge, Dept of Italian): ‘Botticelli’s Illustrations of Dante’s Paradiso: The Construction of Conjoined Vision’ 

  • All Souls College Seminar in Early Modern Intellectual History

5.00–6.45pm, All Souls, Hovenden Room (access is via the entrance to the College on the High Street – please ask at the porter’s lodge for further directions, or consult the information at www.asc.ox.ac.uk/visiting-the-college).

Dmitri Levitin (All Souls College, Oxford): 'What was the comparative history of religion in seventeenth-century Europe? And why did Pierre Bayle believe in virtuous atheists?’ 

  • Besterman Enlightenment Workshop

5 p.m. Voltaire Foundation (99 Banbury Road)

Ruggero Sciuto (University of Oxford): ‘Diderot and d’Holbach on Causal Necessitation’ 

 

Tuesday 17 January

  • Early Modern Literature Seminar

5.15pm, Ertegun House

Maggie Kilgour (McGill): “What did Milton Learn from Shakespeare? The Matter of Macbeth”

 

Wednesday 18 January

  • Early Modern German Culture: An Interdisciplinary Seminar

2pm, Gerry Martin Room, History Faculty (followed by afternoon tea).  

Alix Cooper (Stonybrook University, NY), ‘Family Matters: Natural Knowledge in the Early Modern German Household.’  

  • Graduate Seminar in History 1680-1850

5 p.m.,  Turl Yard Lecture Room, Lincoln College (ask at the college lodge for directions). Tea and Coffee will be served from 4.45pm. All research students working in this period are encouraged to attend; anyone else interested is also very welcome.

Simon Skinner (Balliol): 'Pride and Partridges: Peel and Guns'

  • Seminar in the History of the Exact Sciences

5.00pm, All Souls College, Hovenden Room

Stephen Clucas (Birkbeck, University of London): 'Full Satisfaction: Early Modern Science and Patronage Revisited'

  • Late Medieval Europe Seminar: Paper and Parchment

5 pm, St John’s College, New Seminar Room

John Gagné (University of Sydney): 'Toward a History of Obliteration in the Age of Paper'

 

Thursday 19 January

  • Key Words in Early Modern French Culture Seminar

3.30pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

​Richard Scholar (Oriel College): “Ancients and Moderns” 

  • Early Modern British History Seminar

5pm in The Breakfast Room, Merton College (tea from 4.45)

Ned Ward and Laughter at the end of the Seventeenth Century 
Preparatory reading: Quentin Skinner, 'Why laughing mattered in the Renaissance', History of Political Thought, 22/3 (2001); Jan Bremner and Herman Roodenburg (eds), A Cultural History of Humour (1997), introduction. 
Dr Kate Davison (University of Oxford)

  • Early Modern French Seminar

5.15pm, Maison Française Library (2-10 Norham Road)

Mark Ledbury (University of Sydney):  “Playing the Game of History Painting: François Boucher’s Billiard Room Brilliance” 

 

Friday 20 January

  • The Seminar in the History of the Book

2.15pm, in the Weston Library, Visiting Scholars’ Centre (Level 2)

Professor Ian Maclean (All Souls College, Oxford): 'The Italian Trade with the Frankfurt Book Fair around 1600'

 

And from our Twitter, an Early Modern manuscript from the Bodleian with a small feline surprise: 

 

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